22.6.13

Who says there is only bad news about?

A friend of mine had throat cancer a couple of years back, but he beat it and was declared healthy about a year ago.

Two month ago the tumor returned.

I asked him today how he was, and here is his reply verbatim:
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Thank you for asking, Georg.

After several sessions of chemo, cut short by my low white cell blood count... and a "put me to sleep" for a surgical procedure called a larynsgoscopy for the purpose to "scoop out" tissue for a biopsy, the diagnosis was a tumor on my esophagus.

Surgery was recommended and scheduled for May 14. Because of close proximity to my voice box, the surgeon was going to take my voice box also, And a by-product was loss of smell and taste.

So, I wouldn't be able to speak, taste or smell. I'd have a hole in my throat where I'd have to replace a new tube for each day... and I'd deal with excessive mucus.

I did some research on a treatment mentioned by my oldest son and began an alternative treatment on May 3.

On May 8, I cancelled my surgery. I frankly didn't like the lifestyle I'd have after surgery. The docs were "flabber gasted" to say the least. I continued my alternative treatment, which was for 6 days a week with one off day, then start anew. Each treatment lasted for 1 1/2 hours.

My oncologist scheduled me for a CT scan on May 28, and a followup meeting w/her on May 29. She was going to put the "big push" on me to re-schedule my recommended surgery.

When I asked, "so what did the scan show?"

She said, "there's nothing there." When I asked her to amplify on that statement, she said, "there's no indication of a tumor there."

She then scheduled me for a June 10 session with my surgeon, who has a little camera mounted on a small cable that is inserted down my nasal cavity so he could physically look around the area where the cancer was.

He was astounded to report, "the tumor is no longer there, and there is no inflammation as well."

So, I asked a series of questions...

1. "So you're saying there is no longer a cancerous tumor there, right.?" He said, "that's right."

2. "So, it's gone, right?" He said, "that's right."

3. "Therefore, there's no longer any need for surgery, right?" He concluded with, "that's right."

They don't know what I did and are all kinda bumboozled, to say the least. I have not told them anything at all about the alternative treatment, and won't do so.

So, Georg, I right now show no evidence of the former cancerous tumor on my esophagus, I can still speak, I can still smell, I can still taste... and I don't have a hole in my throat that I have to replace a new plastic tube in every morning, nor am I dealing with excessive mucus everyday.

To say I'm ecstatic is an understatement, of course.

I'm blessed... I'm thankful to my maker above.

I feel good... I feel normal.

My oncologist told me in a prior meeting that a certain % of former smokers have some damaged tissue and are more prone than non-smoker cancer patients to have repeat cancerous tumors. So I'll have to carefully watch for the old dastardly "big C" for the rest of my life.

I'll certainly do that.

The medical community fiercely protects it normal treatment protocol of chemo, radiation and surgery... their money-train.

And they did everything they could to destroy the person who developed this treatment. But enough of his research and successful testing was salvaged for some to be able to replicate his treatment. I was blessed to be able to be put in touch w/a person who treated me, apparently successfully.

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