27.9.11

The Practical Value Of Faith

Let me start this entry with a curiosum. As far as I know, and I was born and raised in Germany, I am, in fact, a German, there is no exact equivalent to the English word “faith”, or indeed the Spanish word “fé” in the German language. I have elsewhere written about the pitfalls of translation, but here it is clear, “faith” and “fé” mean exactly the same, mainly the evidence of things not seen. And that paradigm, that concept does not exist in the German psyche. Unless I just haven’t come across it, which I find hard to believe.

Whatever, this entry is about the kind of faith even an atheist or agnostic can have. We tend to associate faith mainly with one or another religion, a deity, you name it. But it is basically an inner attitude of hope and believe, a certainty that things will turn out all-right. And of course, that inner attitude lends itself readily when associated with belief in God, a life thereafter, etc.

I personally have been a disciple/practitioner of various religions over the years, but faith has eluded me. But I’m working hard on getting it. Why? Because it hit me kind of recently, and it’s very simple: people with faith are having a better time!

I don’t want to fall into clichés like ‘cup half empty'  or 'cup half full’ and stuff like that. That was pretty cool in the nineties, but it has kind of worn itself out. But at this stage of my life I have come to realize that it absolutely doesn’t matter how I see the future.

Things happen the way they happen, good and bad, bingo, it’s called life. And I have to invest the same emotional energy for expecting good things to happen or bad. And since it doesn’t make a difference, I might as well go for the good stuff – at least I’m having a better time on the trip.

9 comments:

  1. Yes, positive attitude!
    @LiftecForklifts

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  2. I understand your points completely and I believe you are right. But if I might add to it, faith is more than a glaube or hoffe, it is also a call to action, a willingness to expend time. One can hope for a better world, and even claim to have faith in one, but ones faith in such is often expended on the energy to create it and make it happen. A true measure because faith is in the end, sacrifice to see the hope realized. You had a wonderful post there.

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  3. And you truly wrote a wonderful comment............

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  4. Well said! We all have that hunger. I lived with it unanswered until I was 25. Here's the story
    How an Agnostic Liberal Becomes a Christian | Applied Faith http://appliedfaith.org/2015/06/01/how-an-agnostic-liberal-becomes-a-christian/

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  5. You nailed it! Faith can be very empowering and healing. So why not? :)

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  6. After the Paris attacks, I wrote a post with some important life questions in it. Whether a person decides to be religious/spiritual/whatever or not, these questions need to be answered to develop and maintain a confident and secure worldview. Scroll down to the bottom of my post: http://www.whatupswags.com/2015/11/paris-is-about-life.html. Your honesty is refreshing; someone who isn't afraid to comment on how faith appears to be a positive thing in the world. Also interesting, as I have recently moved to Germany, and maybe this "faith" translation difficulty may come up in conversations!

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  7. Faith and hope are for the weak,with no self confidence. More appropriate would be to trust. To trust results, to trust yourself, to to trust Nature. to trust past experiences. Yes, trust is more simple.

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  8. I wouldn't label people who have faith as weak. They are guided by an inner conviction and act according to that conviction. Whether this conviction is misguided or not is not for me to say. I've met some real strong people who were acting according to their faith. 'Self-confidence' as agnostics understand it doesn't really enter into the equation here because it's not that important.

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